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Document: 1


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Three-year evaluation of biofeedback techniques in the treatment of children with chronic asthma in a summer camp environment.
Author
Scherr MS; Crawford PL
Source
Ann Allergy, 41: 5, 1978 Nov, 288-92
Abstract
Systematic biofeedback techniques were applied and evaluated in the treatment of chronic bronchial asthma in a summer camp environment during three consecutive summers--1974, 1975 and 1976. From this three-year study the investigators have concluded that biofeedback mediated muscle relaxation training can be a valuable adjunct in the treatment of bronchial asthma.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
79060372

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Camping
Seasons
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Child
Chronic Disease
Electromyography
Evaluation Studies
Human
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0003-4738
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 2


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
The effect of biofeedback training on respiratory resistance of asthmatic children.
Author
Feldman GM
Source
Psychosom Med, 38: 1, 1976 Jan-Feb, 27-34
Abstract
In a pilot study four children with severe asthma were trained to lower their respiratory resistance by means of biofeedback training techniques. Total respiratory resistance measured continuously by the forced oscillation method was used as the feedback signal. Each child demonstrated lowered respiratory resistance after most sessions. Results were comparable with the improvement seen after bronchodilator inhalation therapy. A nonasthmatic child demonstrated no significant changes of respiratory resistance after using the same techniques. Arguments are presented in support of the hypothesis that changes in total respiratory resistance were primarily due to changes in lower airway resistance. Lowering of airway resistance in asthmatic children by use of biofeedback appears possible; its promise calls for further clinical evaluation.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
76152812

MeSH Heading (Major)
Airway Resistance [*/DE]
Asthma [DT/*TH]
Feedback
MeSH Heading
Acoustic Stimulation
Adolescence
Child
Forced Expiratory Volume
Human
Isoproterenol [TU]
Male
Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Residual Volume
Rest
Total Lung Capacity

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0033-3174
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 3


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Asthma: some basic methods of prevention.
Author
Ford RM
Source
Ann Allergy, 42: 2, 1979 Feb, 92-4
Abstract
Present traditional measures employed in the prevention of asthma are reviewed. It is recommended that in view of the extensive and possibly increasing prevalence of the disease together with continuing high death rates more attention in our treatment programs should be devoted to basic prevention in possibly susceptible people. High risk groups such as among small children, in certain industries and in developing counties make this approach especially desirable. An outline of suggested measures is presented.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
79122515

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [DT/IM/*PC]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Adult
Aged
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Child, Preschool
Desensitization, Immunologic
Human
Hypersensitivity [PC]
Middle Age
Occupational Diseases [PC]
Pertussis Vaccine [AE]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0003-4738
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 4


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Tension and relaxation in the individual.
Author
Newbury CR
Source
Int Dent J, 29: 2, 1979 Jun, 173-82
Abstract
Increasing materialism in society is resulting in more wide spread nervous tension in all age groups. While some degree of nervous tension is necessary in everyday living, its adverse effects require that we must learn to bring it under control. Total tension is shown to have two components: a controllable element arising from factors in the environment and the inbuilt uncontrollable residue which is basic in the individual temperament. The effects of excessive or uncontrolled stress can be classified as 1) emotional reactions such as neurotic behaviour (anxiety hypochondria, hysteria, phobia, depression obsessions and compulsions) or psychotic behaviour and 2) psychosomatic reactions (nervous asthma, headache, insomnia, heart attack). Nervous energy can be wastefully expended by such factors as loss of temper, wrong attitudes to work, job frustration and marital strains. Relaxation is the only positive way to control undesirable nervous tension and its techniques require to be learned. A number of techniques (progressive relaxation, differential relaxation, hypnosis, the use of biofeedback, Yoga and Transcendental Meditation) are described and their application to dental practice is discussed.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
79215358

MeSH Heading (Major)
Relaxation Techniques
Stress [CO/ET/PC/PP/PX/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Asthma [ET]
Attitude
Autonomic Nervous System [PH]
Behavior
Defense Mechanisms
Dentists
Energy Metabolism
Headache [ET]
Heart Arrest [ET]
Human
Insomnia [ET]
Occupational Diseases [PC]
Psychophysiologic Disorders [ET]
Stress, Psychological [ET]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0020-6539
Country of Publication
ENGLAND


Document: 5


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Biofeedback and relaxation training in the treatment of psychophysiological disorders: or are the machines really necessary?
Author
Silver BV; Blanchard EB
Source
J Behav Med, 1: 2, 1978 Jun, 217-39
Abstract
The literature on the use of biofeedback and various forms of relaxation training in the treatment of psychophysiological disorders was reviewed; special attention was devoted to studies in which biofeedback and some form of relaxation training were compared. Based on this review, we conclude that there is no consistent advantage for one form of treatment over the other with any psychophysiological disorder for which a comparison has been made, e.g., essential hypertension, migraine headaches, premature ventricular contractions, tension headaches, temporomandibular joint pain, asthma, primary dysmenorrhea, and functional diarrhea. For other disorders in which no comparisons have been made (e.g., Raynaud's disease, sinus tachycardia, peptic uclers, and fecal incontinence) biofeedback seems to be a very promising treatment modality.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
80051955

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Psychophysiologic Disorders [*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Arrhythmia [TH]
Asthma [TH]
Blood Pressure
Colonic Diseases, Functional [TH]
Dysmenorrhea [TH]
Electromyography
Fecal Incontinence [TH]
Female
Headache [TH]
Human
Hypertension [TH]
Migraine [TH]
Peptic Ulcer [TH]
Raynaud's Disease [TH]
Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome [TH]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0160-7715
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 6


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Applications of biofeedback to the treatment of asthma: a critical review.
Author
Kotses H; Glaus KD
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 6: 4, 1981 Dec, 573-93
Abstract
Both muscular and respiratory biofeedback procedures have been employed in attempts to reduce symptoms of bronchial asthma. Research relating to these approaches is reviewed in the present article. Biofeedback training both for facial muscle relaxation and for respiratory resistance decrease improves short-term pulmonary function in asthmatic individuals. These forms of training represent promising avenues for the management of asthma. However, unqualified endorsement of these procedures is premature, at the present time, since their influence on asthma-related variables other than pulmonary function has not been determined and since their long-term effects have not been investigated.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
82113834

MeSH Heading (Major)
Airway Resistance
Asthma [*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Facial Muscles [*PP]
MeSH Heading
Child
Conditioning, Operant
Forced Expiratory Volume
Human
Methods
Muscle Contraction
Muscle Relaxation
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Relaxation Techniques
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 7


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Self-hypnosis, biofeedback, and voluntary peripheral temperature control in children.
Author
Dikel W; Olness K
Source
Pediatrics, 66: 3, 1980 Sep, 335-40
Abstract
Forty-eight children, aged 5 to 15 years, were tested for their ability to raise and lower their index finger temperature with self-hypnosis and/or biofeedback. Group A (self-hypnosis only) and group B (self-hypnosis with biofeedback) were children who had previous successful experience with self-hypnosis (eg, for the treatment of enuresis, pain, asthma, or obesity). Group C (biofeedback only) were children with no experience with hypnosis. All three groups showed significant success with warming and cooling. The range of warming for the three groups was 0 to 3.7 F, and for cooling, 0 to 7.3 F or 0 to 8.8 F for attempts exceeding the ten-minute trial period. No significant difference in ability to warm or cool was noted when the children were compared by group, age, or sex. Some of the children in group A who had little or no success with hypnosis only were very successful with the addition of biofeedback monitoring, suggesting a synergistic effect between biofeedback and hypnosis. A significant temperature rise was also noted in groups A and B accompanying a neutral hypnotic induction relaxation-imagery exercise in which no mention of temperature change was made. This rise varied from 0 to 6 F, averaging 1.7 F. Possible therapeutic implications include the treatment of migraine headaches, Raynaud's syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and the use of temperature monitoring as a diagnostic and therapeutic adjunct to clinical hypnosis.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
81031884

MeSH Heading (Major)
Body Temperature Regulation
Hypnosis [*MT]
Skin Temperature
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fingers
Human
Male
Pilot Projects

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0031-4005
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 8


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Biofeedback training of cardiac acceleration; effects on airway resistance in bronchial asthma.
Author
Harding AV; Maher KR
Source
J Psychosom Res, 26: 4, 1982, 447-54
Abstract
Twenty-four volunteers adolescent and adult asthmatics were pre-tested for suggestibility and retained for an investigation of the airway effects of biofeedback induced voluntary cardiac acceleration. Eight subjects were successful in achieving large magnitude voluntary cardiac acceleration after 2-5 training sessions. Eight matched control group subjects received one session of biofeedback assisted training in cardiac constancy. Results revealed that large magnitude heart rate increase was accompanied by a statistically significant increase in Peak Expiratory Flow Rate for experimental group subjects. Control group subjects showed a drop in heart rate and a statistically insignificant drop in PEFR. Clinical records for experimental and control group subjects during the pre- and post-training periods revealed that a significant reduction in the incidence of attacks, the use of p.r.n. medication, and the index of medication use per attack occurred in trained subjects. No change on any of these criteria occurred for control group subjects. The acquisition of the cardiac acceleration response of asthmatic experimental group subjects was compared with the acquisition rate of a matched group of normal subjects receiving one session of biofeedback training. No differences were revealed between the groups in the rate of acquisition. However, symptom-free asthmatics were shown to have PEFR readings significantly below those of the normal group, thus supporting previous findings. The possible implications of these findings for the clinical management of bronchial asthma, are discussed.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
83059377

MeSH Heading (Major)
Airway Resistance
Asthma [*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*/PH]
Heart Rate
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Female
Human
Male
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0022-3999
Country of Publication
ENGLAND


Document: 9


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Psychophysiological aspects of regulatory functions in man.
Author
Uherík A
Source
Act Nerv Super (Praha), Suppl 3: Pt 2, 1982, 312-5
Abstract
The hypothesis on the relationship between biofeedback and the psychophysiological regulatory properties of Ss was tested experimentally. The Ss were 17 adult males after myocardial infarction, 13 patients with bronchial asthma and 18 healthy adults. Biofeedback was followed through a continuous bioelectrical skin reactivity (BSR) recording as an indicator of changes of the activation level and properties of regulatory functions. The data obtained failed to confirm the proposed hypothesis, however, an analysis of BSR as such showed the regulatory functions to follow a different course and have different properties in the experimental and the control groups.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
83226913

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [PP/*PX]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Galvanic Skin Response [*PH]
Myocardial Infarction [PP/*PX]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0001-7604
Country of Publication
CZECHOSLOVAKIA


Document: 10


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Tools of behavioral medicine: applications of biofeedback treatment for children and adolescents.
Author
Linkenhoker D
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr, 4: 1, 1983 Mar, 16-20
Abstract
This article reviews the role of biofeedback as a tool in behavioral medicine with applications for children and adolescents. Biofeedback as a method for enhancing self-regulation and criteria for prescribing biofeedback interventions are detailed. Clinical and research investigations are reviewed to demonstrate the usefulness of biofeedback in a variety of clinical situations: headache, asthma, hyperactivity, skeletal and smooth muscle dysfunctions, anxiety states, and emotional disorders. Practical guidelines are presented for improving the effectiveness of biofeedback training procedures within a clinical setting and for improving generalization of training to the child's daily life.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
83161672

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Electromyography
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Anxiety Disorders [TH]
Asthma [TH]
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity [TH]
Child
Fecal Incontinence [TH]
Generalization (Psychology)
Headache [TH]
Human
Muscular Diseases [TH]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0196-206X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 11


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Author
Miller WF
Source
Hosp Pract (Hosp Ed), 16: 2, 1981 Feb, 89-106
Abstract
While the prospects of "curing" a patient of emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or asthma are poor, prompt institution of appropriate drug therapy and adjunctive measures can keep the patient from becoming a respiratory cripple.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
81115958

MeSH Heading (Major)
Lung Diseases, Obstructive [DI/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Breathing Exercises
Bronchodilator Agents [TU]
Human
Prognosis

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
8755-4542
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Bronchodilator Agents)


Document: 12


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Anxiety reduction in asthma: four catches to general application.
Author
Kinsman RA; Dirks JF; Jones NF; Dahlem NW
Source
Psychosom Med, 42: 4, 1980 Jul, 397-405
Abstract
Anxiety reduction procedures as adjuncts to medical treatment have almost invariably been reported to benefit asthmatic patients in individual case studies. However, the results of more systematically controlled studied are clearly inconsistent. This discrepancy is understandable in view of what is now known about anxiety in asthma. Four catches, each based on what has been reported about the roles and forms of anxiety in asthma, are presented. Each catch argues against general, across-the-board application of anxiety reduction procedures in asthma. Careful evaluation leading to more problem-oriented treatment is needed in view of the different roles of anxiety in asthma.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
81077827

MeSH Heading (Major)
Anxiety [PX/*TH]
Asthma [*PX]
MeSH Heading
Adaptation, Psychological
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Human
Personality
Relaxation Techniques
Stress, Psychological [PX]
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0033-3174
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 13


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
The efficacy of relaxation training with children.
Author
Richter NC
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol, 12: 2, 1984 Jun, 319-44
Abstract
This paper reviews studies that have examined the efficacy of relaxation training techniques in the treatment of childhood disorders. Methodological problems encountered in doing research in this area resemble those found in working with an adult population: imprecise definitions of subject populations and use of a variety of dependent variables from one study to another. Findings suggest that relaxation training is at least as effective as other treatment approaches for a variety of learning, behavioral, and physiological disorders when it is continued over an extended period of time and is augmented by other supportive measures. Needs for future research include better follow-up studies and further investigations with a behaviorally disruptive population.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
84213606

MeSH Heading (Major)
Mental Disorders [*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Anxiety [TH]
Asthma [TH]
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity [TH]
Autism, Infantile [TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Child Behavior Disorders [TH]
Child, Preschool
Handwriting
Human
Insomnia [TH]
Migraine [TH]
Motor Skills
Research Design
Seizures [TH]
Self Concept

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
ISSN
0091-0627
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
69


Document: 14


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
The behavioral management of asthma and asthma-related problems in children: a critical review of the literature.
Author
King NJ
Source
J Behav Med, 3: 2, 1980 Jun, 169-89
Abstract
This review focuses upon the behavioral approach to childhood asthma. Asthma is defined as intermittent, variable, and reversible airways obstruction with a complex multidimensional etiology. The major measures of asthma include physiological, symptomatic, and collateral measures. The behavioral management of childhood asthma has been restricted to relaxation training, systematic desensitization, assertive training, biofeedback, and deconditioning of exercise-induced asthma. The efficacy of such intervention strategies for asthmatic children is in doubt, although the management of asthma-related problems in children appears to be a more promising area of research. The author suggests that the power of intervention programs for asthmatic children may be strengthened by the development of multifaceted treatment programs contingent upon the antecedents and consequences of the individual case. Also, behavior therapy may be of assistance to mild asthmatic children.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
81028124

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [PX/*TH]
Behavior Therapy [*MT]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Assertiveness
Asthma, Exercise-Induced [PX]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Child, Preschool
Desensitization, Psychologic
Human
Psychoanalytic Theory
Relaxation Techniques

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0160-7715
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 15


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Relaxation therapy in asthma: a critical review.
Author
Erskine-Milliss J; Schonell M
Source
Psychosom Med, 43: 4, 1981 Aug, 365-72
Abstract
This review discusses the relationship between the psychological and physiological factors responsible for airways in asthma and indicates the mechanisms by which psychological methods of treatment may influence airway caliber. The effects of mental and muscular relaxation therapy, systematic desensitization, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation are evaluated in children and adults with asthma. The methodology and results of studies are analyzed critically to present a balanced opinion of the subjective and objective effects of these methods of treatment. Muscular relaxation therapy alone appears to have no effect. Certain mental relaxation techniques, such as autogenic training and transcendental mediation, systematic desensitization, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation, can produce subjective improvement as well as clinically significant improvement in respiratory function and other objective parameters. As with any therapy the response is variable and is influenced by factors such as age and severity of asthma.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
82016114

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [PX/*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Adult
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Desensitization, Psychologic
Human

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0033-3174
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 16


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Psychological treatment of an asthmatic patient in crisis. Dreams, biofeedback, and pain behavior modification.
Author
Meany J; McNamara M; Burks V; Berger TW; Sayle DM
Address
Biofeedback Certification Institute of America, Atascadero, California 93423.
Source
J Asthma, 25: 3, 1988, 141-51
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to discuss a unique, integrated combination of various psychological methods that can be used in the treatment of asthma during an acute episode, as well as in long-term management. Illustrated by a case presentation, the therapeutic approach, totaling 14 treatment sessions for the patient and his wife, included: a psychological evaluation, the use of pain behavior-modification procedures usually performed conjointly with the patient's wife, the analytical use of dreams, the desensitization of anxiety present in dream material, and autogenic therapy combined with thermal biofeedback (i.e., using digital temperature to measure relaxation) both at the medical center and at home. Electromyography (EMG)--a measurement of tension--and electrodermal (EDR)--a measurement of galvanic skin response--biofeedback instruments were used nosologically and therapeutically to measure psychophysiological changes, as well as to reduce emotional stresses related to the patient's asthmatic condition.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
89033676

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [PP/PX/*TH]
Behavior Therapy
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Dreams
Pain
Psychotherapy
MeSH Heading
Behavior
Case Report
Critical Care
Electromyography
Fingers [PP]
Galvanic Skin Response
Human
Male
Middle Age

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0277-0903
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 17


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Trachea-noise biofeedback in asthma: a comparison of the effect of trachea-noise biofeedback, a bronchodilator, and no treatment on the rate of recovery from exercise- and eucapnic hyperventilation-induced asthma.
Author
Mussell MJ; Hartley JP
Address
University of Sussex, England.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 13: 3, 1988 Sep, 219-34
Abstract
We review some of the evidence that supports the existence of psychosomatic triggers to bronchospasm in asthmatics, and hypothesize that it may also be possible to consciously reverse bronchospasm using trachea-noise biofeedback. We precipitated significant levels of bronchospasm in 16 asthmatics using exercise or eucapnic-hyperventilation challenges on five occasions, and administered four different treatments and a no-treatment control. The treatments were trachea-noise biofeedback (TNBF), wrong-information TNBF, an inhaled adrenergic bronchodilator, and a placebo inhaler, all given double blind. Half of the subjects had 3 training days in the use of the TNBF device before study. Our results show that TNBF, in the trained subjects only, is associated with a detectable, but not statistically significant, increase in the rate of recovery from bronchospasm over that found with no treatment. We conclude that, although asthmatics seem to have a strong ability to consciously induce bronchospasm, conscious reversal of a full asthma attack using TNBF is limited. Despite contrary conclusions by other investigators, we believe that this study demonstrated little TNBF-assisted recovery from bronchospasm. We suggest that this is because its effect may be inhibited by humoral mechanisms that sustain the attack, but we believe further work is required to support this.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
89150328

MeSH Heading (Major)
Albuterol [*TU]
Asthma [*TH]
Asthma, Exercise-Induced [ET/PP/*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Bronchial Spasm [ET/PP/*TH]
Hyperventilation [*CO]
Respiratory Sounds [*PP]
Trachea [*PP]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume
Human
Male
Random Allocation

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
CAS Registry/EC Number
18559-94-9 (Albuterol)


Document: 18


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Respiratory resistance feedback in the treatment of bronchial asthma in adults.
Author
Erskine-Milliss JM; Cleary PJ
Address
Student Counselling and Research Unit, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney, Australia.
Source
J Psychosom Res, 31: 6, 1987, 765-75
Abstract
Two studies evaluated feedback of total respiratory resistance of the airways (TRR) as a treatment for adults with moderate to severe chronic bronchial asthma. Respiratory function tests and questionnaires were used to select the patients and to assess treatment effects. Study I provided eight biofeedback sessions in four weeks (each session containing four, 3-min training trials) plus three pre-treatment and three post-treatment sessions. Over the eight treatment sessions biofeedback failed to produce any significant improvements, although overall the nine patients showed lower mean initial TRR values at the three post-treatment sessions compared with the three pre-treatment sessions. Patients consistently showed improvement following bronchodilator administration at the end of every session. In study II, biofeedback was provided in one intensive session of 20, 2-min trials. While careful instruction about biofeedback was provided to subjects, and more post-treatment measures were included, no significant improvements were shown following biofeedback, but were shown following bronchodilator administration.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
88118447

MeSH Heading (Major)
Airway Resistance
Asthma [PX/*TH]
Behavior Therapy
Biofeedback (Psychology)
MeSH Heading
Adult
Female
Human
Lung Volume Measurements
Male

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0022-3999
Country of Publication
ENGLAND


Document: 19


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Measures of asthma severity recorded by patients.
Author
Kotses H; Harver A; Creer TL; Baker AD
Address
Department of Psychology, Ohio University, Athens 45701.
Source
J Asthma, 25: 6, 1988, 373-6
Abstract
Twenty-nine children with asthma made daily recordings of the severity of their asthma for 8 months. Each child recorded four measures of severity: a medication usage score, a morning peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), an evening PEFR, and a subjective rating of overall severity. We determined the relationships between the four measures. Except for the morning and evening PEFRs, the relationships between the measures were weak; the PEFR measures were highly related to one another. The relationship between PEFR scores and medication usage scores increased following biofeedback relaxation training.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
89174395

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [DT/*PP/TH]
Medical Records
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Female
Human
Male
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Severity of Illness Index
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0277-0903
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 20


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Relaxation decreases large-airway but not small-airway asthma.
Author
Lehrer PM; Hochron SM; McCann B; Swartzman L; Reba P
Source
J Psychosom Res, 30: 1, 1986, 13-25
Abstract
Eleven asthmatic subjects were each offered sixteen sessions of relaxation therapy, consisting of progressive relaxation, desensitization, and EMG biofeedback to the trapezius and frontalis areas, while 9 subjects were offered a complex placebo. Subjects in the relaxation condition showed greater improvement than subjects in the placebo condition in performance on a methacholine challenge test which, as a measure of airway reactivity, reflects degree of asthma. Subjects in both conditions showed improvements in various self-report measures of asthma symptoms and psychopathology. Subject in the relaxation condition reported a significantly greater decrease in frequency of emotional precursors to asthma attacks than subjects in the control condition. Overall improvement on the methacholine challenge test was predicted almost perfectly by heliox spirometry. Only subjects showing predominant large-airway obstruction obstruction improved on the methacholine challenge test. The relative contribution of large airway obstruction to asthma was found to correlate with psychopathology.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86199801

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Desensitization, Psychologic
Electromyography
Female
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates
Helium
Human
Male
Methacholine Compounds [DU]
Middle Age
Oxygen
Relaxation Techniques
Spirometry

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0022-3999
Country of Publication
ENGLAND
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Methacholine Compounds)
55-92-5 (Methacholine Chloride)
58933-55-4 (heliox)
7440-59-7 (Helium)
7782-44-7 (Oxygen)


Document: 21


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Behavioral interventions as adjunctive treatments for chronic asthma.
Author
Cluss PA
Source
Prog Behav Modif, 20:1986, 123-60
Abstract
Results of this review of the behavioral literature on asthma therapy indicate that systematic desensitization, operant interventions, and biofeedback treatments have been successful in altering pulmonary functioning, asthma symptomatology, and/or asthma-related behaviors, whereas some evidence for the limited effectiveness of relaxation training has been demonstrated. The clinical usefulness of these techniques remains open to interpretation. It cannot be said, however, that the results reported represent the definitive statement regarding the usefulness of these interventions, due to the lack of methodological sophistication evident in this body of research. Behavioral investigators currently interested in this area have the opportunity to design and implement research strategies which attend to sound methodological considerations and which may present a clearer demonstration of the efficacy of the adjunctive behavioral treatments which have been used with asthma patients for the past several decades.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86205508

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [ET/*TH]
Behavior Therapy [*/MT]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Adult
Assertiveness
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Desensitization, Psychologic
Human
Middle Age
Patient Compliance
Random Allocation
Relaxation Techniques
Research Design
Respiratory Airflow

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
ISSN
0099-037X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
81


Document: 22


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Trachea noise biofeedback device to help reduce bronchospasm in asthmatics.
Author
Mussell MJ
Source
J Biomed Eng, 8: 4, 1986 Oct, 341-4
Abstract
Evidence suggests that conscious control of bronchial smooth muscle tone may be possible. The asthmatic wheeze is caused mainly by broncho-constriction and it is hypothesized that if wheeze were consciously reduced, some bronchodilation would occur. Described here is a biofeedback device which records asthmatic tracheal noise with a microphone, and generates both an audio and visual display of the degree of wheeze sound intensity. The subject attempts to reduce wheeze using the device. Wrong information is also generated within the device so that the placebo effect can be investigated.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
87013178

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [PP/*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*IS]
Bronchial Spasm [*PC/PP]
Trachea [*PP]
MeSH Heading
Biomedical Engineering
Human
Muscle, Smooth [PP]
Noise
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0141-5425
Country of Publication
ENGLAND


Document: 23


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Long-term effects of biofeedback-induced facial relaxation on measures of asthma severity in children.
Author
Kotses H; Harver A; Segreto J; Glaus KD; Creer TL; Young GA
Address
Psychology Department, Ohio University, Athens 45701.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 16: 1, 1991 Mar, 1-21
Abstract
We studied the effects of electromyographic biofeedback on measures of asthma severity in children. Fifteen children received biofeedback training to reduce facial tension, and 14 children, who served as controls, received biofeedback training to maintain facial tension at a stable level. Assignment to experimental condition was random. As a result of training, electromyographic levels decreased in children trained in facial relaxation and remained fairly constant in children trained in facial tension stability. Biofeedback training was augmented for children in both groups by having them practice their facial exercises at home. Each child's condition was followed for a five-month period subsequent to biofeedback training. Throughout the experiment, the following measures of asthma severity were monitored: lung function, self-rated asthma severity, medication usage, and frequency of asthma attacks. In addition, standardized measures of attitudes toward asthma, self-concept, and chronic anxiety were recorded at regular intervals. As compared to the facial stability subjects, the facial relaxation subjects exhibited higher pulmonary scores, more positive attitudes toward asthma, and lower chronic anxiety during the follow-up period. Subjects in the two groups, however, did not differ on self-rated asthma severity, medication usage, frequency of asthma attacks, or self-concept. Based on the improvements we observed in pulmonary, attitude, and anxiety measures, we concluded that biofeedback training for facial relaxation contributes to the self-control of asthma and would be a valuable addition to asthma self-management programs.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91190982

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [DI/*PP/PX]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*PH]
Facial Muscles [*PH]
Muscle Relaxation [*PH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Child
Electromyography
Female
Human
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Spirometry
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Time Factors

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 24


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Fifteen-month follow-up with asthmatics utilizing EMG/incentive inspirometer feedback.
Author
Peper E; Tibbetts V
Address
Institute for Holistic Healing Studies, San Francisco State University, California 94132.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 17: 2, 1992 Jun, 143-51
Abstract
This study reports on the follow-up data of an integrated group program to reduce asthmatic symptoms. The 16 sessions included a comprehensive multibehavioral/desensitization retraining program and utilized EMG/Incentive inspirometer feedback to encourage slow diaphragmatic breathing in all situations. 17 out of 21 volunteers participated in the 15-month follow-up study. At the follow-up all subjects significantly reduced their EMG tension levels while simultaneously increasing their inhalation volumes. Subjects reported reductions in their asthma symptoms, medication use, emergency room visits, and breathless episodes.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92256544

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
MeSH Heading
Adult
Breathing Exercises
Electromyography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Male
Middle Age

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 25


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
EMG stability as a biofeedback control.
Author
Harver A; Segreto J; Kotses H
Address
University of North Carolina, Charlotte.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 17: 2, 1992 Jun, 159-64
Abstract
Factors that may confound comparisons between electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training and its control conditions include feedback quality and experience of success. We investigated the usefulness of a control procedure designed to overcome these potential sources of confounding. The procedure consisted of training muscle tension stability. We used it as a control for frontal EMG relaxation training in children with asthma. To equate the groups for feedback quality and experience of success, we gave each child in the control condition audio feedback decreasing in pitch when muscle tension was at or near baseline levels, and feedback increasing in pitch when muscle tension was either substantially above or below baseline levels. Children in both groups were instructed to decrease the pitch of the tone. In comparison to children in the relaxation condition, the children in the control condition exhibited stable levels of muscle tension throughout eight training sessions. We concluded that feedback for stable muscle tension may be a useful control procedure for EMG biofeedback training whenever experimental and control procedures differ in either feedback quality of degree to which they permit subjects to experience success.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92256546

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*MT]
Electromyography [*MT]
Muscle Relaxation [*PH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Child
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Human
Patient Education
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 26


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Psychological approaches to the treatment of asthma.
Author
Lehrer PM; Sargunaraj D; Hochron S
Address
Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway 08854-5635.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol, 60: 4, 1992 Aug, 639-43
Abstract
Outcome literature on psychological treatment for asthma covers psychoeducational self-management programs, relaxation therapy, biofeedback, and family therapy. Psychoeducational approaches now being standardized in a national program are cost-effective. They produce improved adjustment, increased medication compliance, greater perceived self-competence in managing symptoms, and decreased use of medical services. Significant effects have been found for relaxation therapy, although it is not clear whether the effectiveness depends on whole-body relaxation or specifically facial- or respiratory-muscle relaxation. Family therapy is helpful to some asthmatics. Active components in these methods remain to be identified as do the populations whom they can best serve. Biofeedback for respiratory resistance, trachea sounds, and vagal tone shows promise but has not been given adequate clinical testing.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92372779

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [PX/*TH]
Behavior Therapy [*MT]
MeSH Heading
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Family Therapy [MT]
Human
Patient Compliance [PX]
Relaxation Techniques
Self Care [PX]
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0022-006X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
45


Document: 27


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Improving recognition of respiratory sensations in healthy adults.
Author
Stout C; Kotses H; Creer TL
Address
Psychology Department, Ohio University, Athens 45701.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 18: 2, 1993 Jun, 79-92
Abstract
In two discrimination training studies, we noted improvements in the ability of healthy individuals to discriminate between respiratory sensations. We trained individuals to discriminate between respiratory sensations elicited during inspiration in Experiment 1 and during expiration in Experiment 2. We elicited respiratory sensations by having participants breathe through circuits that differed in their resistance to air flow. Training, in both experiments, was conducted within the context of a task in which individuals judged which member of a series of respiratory circuit pairs was easier to breathe through. To improve the accuracy of judgments, we gave participants feedback of their performance, and we faded air flow resistance. The latter procedure consisted of presenting circuit pairs in order of increasing similarity. Individuals who received performance feedback with fading of air flow resistance demonstrated reliable improvements in discrimination from pre- to posttraining in both experiments, but controls, who received either performance feedback or practice in discrimination did not. These findings may contribute to improving awareness of respiratory sensations in asthma patients, and thereby bolster efforts to manage asthma.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
93312944

MeSH Heading (Major)
Perception
Respiration
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Adult
Awareness
Feedback
Female
Human
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 28


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Clinical evaluation of a respiratory resistance biofeedback training.
Author
Mass R; Dahme B; Richter R
Address
Psychiatric Clinic, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 18: 4, 1993 Dec, 211-23
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of a respiratory resistance biofeedback training. Fifteen adult asthmatic subjects participated in a feedback training program including twelve feedback sessions (three sessions weekly). Respiratory resistance (Ros) was measured using the forced oscillation method; to prevent subjects from lung hyperinflation, feedback was interrupted when functional residual capacity increased. One-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), usage of self-administered medication, degree of asthmatic dyspnoea, and general activity were daily recorded in symptom diaries for at least three months, starting four weeks before the first feedback session. Seven subjects showed significant average Ros decreases within the sessions, while mean Ros in two subjects was increased. However, these direct feedback effects were not related to transfer effects outside the laboratory: e.g., not one of the seven successful subjects showed FEV1 improvements, and only in one of them were within-session Ros reductions accompanied by a decreased frequency of self-administered medication during the training period. These results lead to the conclusion that Ros feedback may not be an effective technique for the treatment of bronchial asthma in adults.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
94176579

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma [DT/PP/*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*MT]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Bronchodilator Agents [AD]
Female
Human
Male
Maximal Expiratory Flow Rate
Middle Age
Respiration
Self Administration
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Bronchodilator Agents)


Document: 29


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Breathing, voice, and movement therapy: applications to breathing disorders.
Author
Buchholz I
Address
KlangKoerperBewegung Institut, München, Germany. ..F00K:Gindler E
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 19: 2, 1994 Jun, 141-53
Abstract
Elsa Gindler (1885-1961) developed a holistic approach to the human body and psyche via the movement of breath. Gindler experimented with movements to strengthen the deeper layers of the muscular system and improve the circulation of oxygen, movements that reduced tensions that had been preventing the breathing muscles from functioning properly. Subsequently, she founded a school for breathing and body awareness. The biggest breathing muscle in the human body is the diaphragm, the lowering of which can only take place when the jaw and the throat are relaxed, the belly is free, and the psoas (major and minor) and hip joints allow free leg-movement and flexibility in the lower back. When these conditions do not obtain, the body compensates by lifting the shoulders, pulling up the chest bone, and contracting the sphincter muscles in the throat, movements which weaken the muscles which assist the breathing process. Thus, the compensatory muscles are overburdened and the fine organization of the body is disturbed; the natural capacity to use the breath as a healing force is lost. The goal of breath therapy is to recognize and reestablish this capacity. Training sessions are devoted to relaxation; to exercises to rebuild muscle tone, strengthen weakened muscles, release contracted areas, and the use of the voice to stimulate the respiratory system. Sessions typically consist of (a) relaxation, (b) activation (experimenting with new, freer ways of moving), and (c) integration (application to everyday life). The therapist analyzes incidents of stress in the client's life where breathing is likely to be disturbed. This is especially important for asthmatics who can learn how to deal with an attack by relaxing rather than contracting. This work is especially beneficial for problems in (a) the skeletal structure, (b) respiration, (c) vital organs, and (d) general symptoms.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95002280

MeSH Heading (Major)
Breathing Exercises
Respiration Disorders [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Asthma [TH]
Exercise Therapy [HI]
Germany
History of Medicine, 20th Cent.
Human
Hyperventilation [TH]
Voice

Publication Type
HISTORICAL ARTICLE
HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 30


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Do voluntary changes in inspiratory-expiratory ratio prevent exercise-induced asthma?
Author
Ceugniet F; Cauchefer F; Gallego J
Address
Le Balcon de Cerdagne, Font-Romeu, France.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 19: 2, 1994 Jun, 181-8
Abstract
It is often admitted that heat exchange in the airways is a major cause of exercise-induced asthma. Because a decrease in the inspiratory time/expiratory time ratio (TI/TE) decreases these exchanges, we postulated that it might decrease bronchoconstriction as well. Twenty-four asthmatic children, divided into three groups, underwent two exercise provocation tests, 24 hours apart (outdoor running for 6 min). The first test was identical for all the subjects. In the second test, the first group did not receive any instruction concerning breathing pattern. The second group was instructed to adopt equal inspiratory and expiratory times (TI/TE = 1). The third group had to adopt an expiratory time three times longer than inspiratory time (TI/TE = 1/3). The three groups displayed similar pulmonary function tests (FEV1 and FVC), cardiac frequency, and running performances. However, FEV1 significantly improved in the second session. This suggested that familiarization with the task and related psychological factors may influence asthma more than voluntary changes in TI/TE.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95002283

MeSH Heading (Major)
Asthma, Exercise-Induced [*PC/PP]
Breathing Exercises
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Body Temperature Regulation
Forced Expiratory Volume
Human
Lung [PH]
Male
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 31


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Asthmatic extrathoracic upper airway obstruction: laryngeal dyskinesis.
Author
Nahmias J; Tansey M; Karetzky MS
Address
Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, NJ 07112.
Source
N J Med, 91: 9, 1994 Sep, 616-20
Abstract
Laryngeal dyskinesis is a functional asthma-like disorder refractory to bronchodilator regimens. Patients treated with electroencephalographic neurofeedback training demonstrate clinical improvement with reversal of their variable extrathoracic upper airway obstruction.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95060357

MeSH Heading (Major)
Airway Obstruction [*PP/TH]
Asthma [*PP/TH]
Laryngostenosis [*PP/TH]
Movement Disorders [*PP/TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Aged
Biofeedback (Psychology) [PH]
Female
Human
Larynx [PP]
Middle Age
Respiratory Airflow [PH]
Vocal Cords [PP]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0885-842X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 32


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Autogenic training: a narrative and quantitative review of clinical outcome.
Author
Linden W
Address
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 19: 3, 1994 Sep, 227-64
Abstract
This review of controlled outcome research on Autogenic Training complements the literature by pooling narrative and quantitative approaches, by including only studies with experimental controls, by integrating the English and German literature, and by adding research findings published since the last review. Whereas previous reviews have already reported positive effects of Autogenic Training for migraine, insomnia, and test anxiety, additional supportive findings for angina pectoris, asthma, childbirth, eczema, hypertension, infertility, Raynaud's disease, and recovery from myocardial infarction are discussed here. The impact of protocol variations on outcome is described, and the specificity of Autogenic Training relative to other stress management techniques is highlighted. Quantitative findings suggested that Autogenic Training was associated with medium-sized pre- to posttreatment effects ranging from d = .43 for biological indices of change to d = .58 for psychological and behavioral indices thus matching effect sizes for other biobehavioral treatment techniques like biofeedback and muscular relaxation. Length of treatment did not affect clinical outcome. The discussion emphasizes how narrative and quantitative strategies complement one another.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95110904

MeSH Heading (Major)
Autogenic Training
MeSH Heading
Female
Human
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
76

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