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Document: 1


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Home- vs. clinic-based biofeedback treatment for pediatric migraine: results of treatment through one-year follow-up.
Author
Burke EJ; Andrasik F
Source
Headache, 29: 7, 1989 Jul, 434-40
Abstract
While temperature biofeedback and related bio-behavioral procedures have become common in the treatment of adult migraineurs, the application of these techniques to the pediatric population has lagged far behind. The current investigation was undertaken to examine various methods for delivering biofeedback with this population. Nine children participated in this single-subject, clinical replication series in which clinic-based therapist-administered, home-based child-administered, and home-based parent-administered treatment formats were evaluated. Headache activity was assessed through the use of a daily headache log. Overall, results supported the utility of temperature biofeedback in the treatment of pediatric migraine. Further, it was suggested that home-based treatments may represent an equally efficacious and more cost-effective alternative to traditional clinic-based treatments. Finally, treatment effects were found to be stable, with results maintaining through a one-year follow-up period.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
89339998

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Home Nursing [*/EC]
Migraine [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Body Temperature
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Male
Methods
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 2


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Biofeedback and relaxation treatments for headache in the elderly: a caution and a challenge.
Author
Blanchard EB; Andrasik F; Evans DD; Hillhouse J
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 10: 1, 1985 Mar, 69-73
Abstract
Results for 11 older (60 years or greater) headache patients treated with combinations of biofeedback and relaxation are presented. Overall, only 18.2% were clinically improved after treatment. None of the 5 tension headache patients were improved. Suggestions for future work with the older headache patient are offered.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86104482

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Headache [CL/*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Aged
Evaluation Studies
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age
Migraine [TH]
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 3


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Biofeedback control of migraine headaches: a comparison of two approaches.
Author
Gauthier J; Lacroix R; Coté A; Doyon J; Drolet M
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 10: 2, 1985 Jun, 139-59
Abstract
In order to assess the relative effectiveness of finger warming and temporal blood volume pulse reduction biofeedback in the treatment of migraine, 22 female migraine patients were assigned to one of three experimental conditions: temporal artery constriction feedback, finger temperature feedback, or waiting list. Biofeedback training consisted of 12 sessions over a 6-week period. All patients completed 5 weeks of daily self-monitoring of headache activity (frequency, duration, and intensity) and medication before and after treatment. Treatment credibility was assessed at the end of Sessions 1, 6, and 12. Results showed that temporal constriction and finger temperature biofeedback were equally effective in controlling migraine headaches and produced greater benefits than the waiting list condition. Power analyses indicated that very large sample sizes would have been required to detect any significant differences between the two treatment groups. No significant relationships were found between levels of therapeutic gains and levels of thermal or blood volume pulse self-regulation skills. Likewise, treatment outcome was not found to be related to treatment credibility. Further analyses revealed that changes in headache activity and medication were associated with changes in vasomotor variability. Because blood volume pulse variability was not significantly affected by biofeedback training, questions about its role in the therapeutic mechanism are raised.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86187967

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [PP/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Blood Volume
Body Temperature Regulation
Clinical Trials
Comparative Study
Female
Fingers
Human
Middle Age
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vasoconstriction

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 4


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Behavioral management of childhood headache: a pilot study and case history report.
Author
Womack WM; Smith MS; Chen AC
Address
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle 98195.
Source
Pain, 32: 3, 1988 Mar, 279-83
Abstract
Many chronically recurrent disorders of children and adolescents are often unresponsive to standard medical therapy. The Stress and Headache Management Clinic was established as a prototype behavioral medicine clinic to provide integrated therapeutic modalities. Using biofeedback and relaxation/mental-imagery techniques, 119 patients with the chief complaint of recurrent headache were evaluated. This paper describes the use, application, and efficacy of behavioral techniques for the management of headache in children and adolescents. Relevant treatment factors in behavioral treatment of pediatric headache are also discussed.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
88202955

MeSH Heading (Major)
Behavior Therapy
Headache [PX/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Case Report
Child
Female
Human
Male
Migraine [PX/TH]
Pilot Projects
Relaxation Techniques

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0304-3959
Country of Publication
NETHERLANDS


Document: 5


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Hypnotherapy: a cyberphysiologic strategy in pain management.
Author
Olness K
Address
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am, 36: 4, 1989 Aug, 873-84
Abstract
Children have the capacity to learn cyberphysiologic strategies in pain management. Training in such strategies can be accomplished in one to four training sessions, depending on the type of pain problems. Even in an acute emergency situation, children can benefit from informal hypnotic and biofeedback techniques. Both clinical and laboratory studies confirm the ability of children to self-regulate specific autonomic functions such as control of peripheral temperature and GSR. Such skills can be used to demonstrate to children the connections between changes in thinking and changes in body responses and pave the way for development of skills in self-regulation of pain.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
89331081

MeSH Heading (Major)
Cybernetics [*/HI]
Hypnosis [*/HI]
Pain [DI/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case Report
Child
Desensitization, Psychologic
Emergencies
Female
History of Medicine, 18th Cent.
History of Medicine, 19th Cent.
History of Medicine, 20th Cent.
Human
Male
Migraine [TH]
Parents
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Relaxation Techniques

Publication Type
HISTORICAL ARTICLE
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0031-3955
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
36


Document: 6


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Evaluation and treatment of headache. Practical approach to a common symptom.
Author
Hansotia P
Source
Postgrad Med, 79: 6, 1986 May 1, 75-9, 82-4
Abstract
Chronic headache pain has many causes but is generally attributed to one of three mechanisms: muscular contraction, vascular inflammation, or traction or inflammation of pain-sensitive structures. Because of the wide variety of headache types and the often-confusing terminology and classification systems in use, evaluation of headache can be difficult. A step-by-step approach to patient workup, including patient history, physical examination, and appropriate tests, can help the physician pinpoint the underlying problem and determine appropriate therapy. Long-term drug therapy is effective for most patients with vascular headaches. For headaches of psychogenic origin, therapy includes psychotropic drugs, biofeedback training, counseling, and behavior modification. More research in the area of mind-body interactions will lead to improved management of chronic headache of nonorganic origin.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86205603

MeSH Heading (Major)
Headache [CL/*DI/DT/ET]
MeSH Heading
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic [TU]
Chronic Disease
Ergotamine [TU]
Human
Migraine [DI/DT]
Propranolol [TU]
Psychotherapy
Vascular Headache [DI/DT]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0032-5481
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic)
113-15-5 (Ergotamine)
525-66-6 (Propranolol)


Document: 7


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Results of a controlled, experimental, outcome study of nondrug treatments for the control of migraine headaches.
Author
Sargent J; Solbach P; Coyne L; Spohn H; Segerson J
Source
J Behav Med, 9: 3, 1986 Jun, 291-323
Abstract
Headache variables were examined for 136 subjects who participated for 36 weeks in one of four groups--No Treatment, Autogenic Phrases, Electromyographic (EMG) Biofeedback, and Thermal Biofeedback. All subjects kept daily records of headache activity and medication usage and participated in 22 laboratory sessions during which frontalis electromyographic and hand-temperature measurements were taken; those in the three treatment groups practiced at home. There was a substantial reduction in headache variables in all groups. The No-Treatment Group differed significantly from the treatment groups combined, with the least reduction in headache variables. The Thermal Biofeedback Group vs. EMG Biofeedback and Autogenic Phrases Groups showed a suggestive trend toward improvement in the frequency and intensity of total headache.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86307997

MeSH Heading (Major)
Autogenic Training
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [DT/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Body Temperature Regulation
Comparative Study
Electromyography
Facial Muscles
Female
Hand
Human
Male
Skin Temperature
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0160-7715
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 8


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Mediating factors in non-medical treatment for migraine headache: toward an interactional model.
Author
Litt MD
Source
J Psychosom Res, 30: 4, 1986, 505-19
Abstract
The inadequacy of traditional (i.e. pharmacological) treatment for migraine headache has led to the development of numerous non-medical interventions (e.g. biofeedback, relaxation, cognitive-behavioral programs). All of these non-medical interventions have produced at least some success in reducing migraine headache parameters. However the mechanism of treatment efficacy is unclear, with a number of not mutually exclusive relationships proposed. Purported mediators of successful outcome in these treatments include specific control of vascular activity, general reduction of autonomic arousal, biochemical changes, cognitive, affective, and behavioral change, therapist contact and support, and credibility and placebo expectancy. The present paper attempts to discuss and evaluate the mechanisms of change that have been proposed as mediators of successful treatment of migraine headache. An interactional model of adaptive change as a function of treatment is presented. The implications of the model for assessment and treatment are discussed. It is suggested that the interactional model may be applicable to the treatment of a range of chronic pain problems.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
87011474

MeSH Heading (Major)
Behavior Therapy
Migraine [PP/PX/*TH]
Models, Theoretical
MeSH Heading
Arousal [PH]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [PH]
Blood Vessels [PP]
Cognition
Human
Relaxation
Serotonin [PH]
Social Support

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0022-3999
Country of Publication
ENGLAND
CAS Registry/EC Number
50-67-9 (Serotonin)


Document: 9


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Childhood migraine. Differential diagnosis and treatment.
Author
MacDonald JT
Source
Postgrad Med, 80: 5, 1986 Oct, 301-4, 306
Abstract
Migraine headaches may be confused with other types of headache, namely, those caused by tension and by organic disorders, but several features often set them apart. For one, migraines are often accompanied by other symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting. Also, they often are present in the family history. Treatment can involve such methods as biofeedback, diet, and limitation of exercise, and a number of medications are available for both treatment and prophylaxis. Studies of drug treatment of childhood migraine are few, so clinicians must tailor treatment to the individual case, watching for side effects and limiting the duration of treatment as much as possible.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
87016731

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [*/CO/DI/DT/PC/TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Headache [DI]
Human
Hypnosis
Propranolol [TU]
Vomiting [DT/ET]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0032-5481
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
CAS Registry/EC Number
525-66-6 (Propranolol)


Document: 10


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Three studies of the psychologic changes in chronic headache patients associated with biofeedback and relaxation therapies.
Author
Blanchard EB; Andrasik F; Appelbaum KA; Evans DD; Myers P; Barron KD
Source
Psychosom Med, 48: 1-2, 1986 Jan-Feb, 73-83
Abstract
Three separate, but similar, studies are described in which the psychologic effects (depression, anxiety, and overall degree of psychosomatic distress) of nonpharmacologic treatment (relaxation and/or biofeedback training) for three kinds of chronic headache (tension, migraine, and mixed migraine and tension) were evaluated. Results showed consistently (across all three studies) significant reductions in depression and trait-anxiety associated with receiving treatment, regardless of headache type or treatment outcome. The significant reduction for overall degree of psychosomatic distress was not differentially related to receiving treatment and thus could have been due to prolonged monitoring of headaches or test-retest regression effects.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86121503

MeSH Heading (Major)
Affective Symptoms [CO/*TH]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Headache [CO/*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Adult
Aged
Anxiety [TH]
Combined Modality Therapy
Depression [TH]
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age
Migraine [CO/TH]
Psychophysiologic Disorders [TH]
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0033-3174
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 11


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Biofeedback and relaxation-response training in the treatment of pediatric migraine.
Author
Fentress DW; Masek BJ; Mehegan JE; Benson H
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol, 28: 2, 1986 Apr, 139-46
Abstract
To assess the efficacy of electromyographic biofeedback, relaxation-response training and pain behavior management as a treatment for pediatric migraine, we studied 18 children between the ages of eight and 12 years (mean = 10 X 1) in a prospective, randomized, controlled investigation. Six patients received all three treatment procedures, six received relaxation-response training and pain behavior management, and the remaining six constituted a waiting-list control group. All patients kept a record of their headaches for the 15-week study period and then for four weeks one year later. Following four weeks of baseline, the treatment groups completed nine one-hour treatment sessions in 11 weeks. Both treatment groups experienced a significant reduction in headache symptoms and were significantly improved compared to the waiting-list control group by the end of treatment. The treatment groups did not differ from each other in any of these comparisons. The reduction in headache symptoms in the treatment groups was maintained one year after treatment ended. These results suggest that relaxation-response training, with or without biofeedback training, combined with pain behavior management, is an effective alternative treatment for pediatric migraine.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
86221354

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Behavior Therapy [MT]
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Female
Human
Male
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0012-1622
Country of Publication
ENGLAND


Document: 12


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
A review and clinical perspective on the use of EMG and thermal biofeedback for chronic headaches.
Author
Chapman SL
Source
Pain, 27: 1, 1986 Oct, 1-43
Abstract
A comprehensive survey of EMG and thermal biofeedback for chronic muscle contraction and migraine headaches is presented. The studies done to date suggest a high degree of short-term efficacy of biofeedback, which has been maintained on long-term follow-ups. While comparisons of biofeedback with relaxation generally have shown approximately equivalent effectiveness, the two forms of therapy may be differentially effective with different subjects. Attempts to correlate EMG and/or thermal parameters with headache parameters generally have failed to produce significant results, particularly in more recent and better-controlled studies; however, numerous technical and procedural difficulties have obscured meaningful interpretation of physiological data. Results with pseudofeedback do suggest a likely specific contribution of frontalis EMG to muscle contraction headaches, at least for some subjects. Comparable evidence for a specific contribution of thermal parameters to migraines is almost totally lacking. Clinical outcome research suggests that biofeedback in general may be more effective in younger anxious subjects who show no chronic habituation to drugs, and that there is little apparent benefit from repeating biofeedback for more than about 12 sessions maximum. Three broad areas for subsequent research are suggested: longitudinal study of EMG and thermal parameters in a naturalistic setting, specification of processes critically involved in biofeedback, and clinically relevant comparative outcome research with biofeedback and alternative therapies.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
87066395

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*PH]
Electromyography
Headache [PP/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Chronic Disease
Female
Heat [TU]
Human
Male

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
ISSN
0304-3959
Country of Publication
NETHERLANDS
Number Of References
205


Document: 13


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
An adolescent girl with headache and syncope.
Author
Smith MS; Glass ST
Address
University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle 98195.
Source
J Adolesc Health Care, 10: 1, 1989 Jan, 54-6
Abstract
A 14-year-old girl with a 3-month history of multiple syncopal episodes followed by headache was diagnosed as having basilar artery migraine. She did not improve on anticonvulsant, anticholinergic, or beta-blocker therapy. Her symptoms resolved during a course of skin temperature biofeedback training, and she remains asymptomatic at 1 year follow-up.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
89155302

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [*CO/DI/TH]
Syncope [*ET]
Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency [*CO/TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Case Report
Female
Human

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0197-0070
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 14


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
BVP-biofeedback in the treatment of migraine. The effects of constriction and dilatation during different phases of the migraine attack.
Author
Lisspers J; Ost LG
Address
Psychiatric Research Center, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Behav Modif, 14: 2, 1990 Apr, 200-21
Abstract
Biofeedback training for self-regulation of blood-volume pulse ("BVP") amplitude of the temporal arteries has been used previously with good results in treatment of migraine headaches. In the present study, 23 subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups and given (a) biofeedback training in temporal artery constriction and instructions to apply these skills during headaches; (b) the same training and instructions to apply the skills between headaches, during stress periods, and (c) biofeedback training to dilate the temporal arteries, and instructions to use these skills during stress periods. Clinically meaningful headache reductions were achieved and maintained at follow-up. Furthermore, results indicated that voluntary temporal artery dilatation also leads to headache reductions, and that there is a connection between levels of achieved self-regulation skill and the clinical effects.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
90234030

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*PH]
Migraine [PP/*TH]
Temporal Arteries [*PP]
Vasoconstriction [*PH]
Vasodilation [*PH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Blood Volume [PH]
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age
Pulse [PH]
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0145-4455
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 15


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Assessment of dietary risk factors in chronic headache.
Author
Guarnieri P; Radnitz CL; Blanchard EB
Address
Skidmore College, Albany, New York.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 15: 1, 1990 Mar, 15-25
Abstract
An investigation of the awareness level and potential impact of dietary risk factors on chronic headache patients revealed that (1) approximately 75% of the 130 patients in this study stated they were aware of possible food-intake/headache connections, (2) less than half reported being informed of this relationship by medical professionals, and (3) the awareness of this nutritional information did not prompt changes in subjects' dietary practices. The comparison of food-intake patterns of the headache patients and nonheadache control group revealed a significant difference only on red wine consumption.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
90298196

MeSH Heading (Major)
Diet [*AE]
Migraine [*ET]
Vascular Headache [*ET]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Diet Records
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age
Patient Education
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Wine [AE]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 16


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Evaluation of home-based thermal biofeedback treatment of pediatric migraine headache.
Author
Guarnieri P; Blanchard EB
Address
State University of New York, Albany.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 15: 2, 1990 Jun, 179-84
Abstract
Sixteen children and adolescents with migraine headache were treated with thermal biofeedback. Seven were seen individually in the clinic while the other nine participated in a limited-contact, partly home-based regimen. Evaluation of headache diary data from 4-week monitoring periods before and after treatment showed significant (p less than .01) reduction in headaches, with no significant difference in efficacy between the two conditions.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
90381329

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heat
Home Nursing
Human
Male
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 17


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Contemporary management of migraine, Part 2.
Author
Beckett BE
Address
Samford University School of Pharmacy, Birmingham, Alabama.
Source
Am Pharm, NS30: 4, 1990 Apr, 42-5
Abstract
Prophylactic therapy is an important tool in the overall management of migraine. Established agents include beta blockers, methysergide, and TCAs. Other modalities, such as calcium channel blockers, NSAIDs, and biofeedback, may be useful when first-line therapy is ineffective. Understanding the use of abortive and prophylactic therapy of migraine will enable the pharmacist to play an important part in patient care.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
90209877

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [*DT]
MeSH Heading
Human

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0160-3450
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
16


Document: 18


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
A controlled evaluation of thermal biofeedback and thermal biofeedback combined with cognitive therapy in the treatment of vascular headache.
Author
Blanchard EB; Appelbaum KA; Radnitz CL; Morrill B; Michultka D; Kirsch C; Guarnieri P; Hillhouse J; Evans DD; Jaccard J; et al
Address
Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, State University of New York, Albany 12203.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol, 58: 2, 1990 Apr, 216-24
Abstract
One-hundred-sixteen patients suffering from vascular headache (migraine or combined migraine and tension) were, after 4 weeks of pretreatment baseline headache monitoring, randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) thermal biofeedback with adjunctive relaxation training (TBF); (b) TBF plus cognitive therapy; (c) pseudomediation as an ostensible attention-placebo control; or (d) headache monitoring. The first three groups received 16 individual sessions over 8 weeks, while the fourth group continued to monitor headaches. All groups then monitored headaches for a 4-week posttreatment baseline. Analyses revealed that all treated groups improved significantly more than the headache monitoring group with no significant differences among the three treated groups. On a measure of clinically significant improvement, the two TBF groups had slightly higher (51%) degree of improvement than the meditation group (37.5%). It is argued that the attention-placebo control became an active relaxation condition.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
90243929

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Cognitive Therapy [*MT]
Migraine [*TH]
Vascular Headache [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Aged
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Male
Middle Age
Randomized Controlled Trials
Relaxation Techniques
Skin Temperature
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0022-006X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 19


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
A controlled evaluation of the addition of cognitive therapy to a home-based biofeedback and relaxation treatment of vascular headache.
Author
Blanchard EB; Appelbaum KA; Nicholson NL; Radnitz CL; Morrill B; Michultka D; Kirsch C; Hillhouse J; Dentinger MP
Address
Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, State University of New York, Albany 12203.
Source
Headache, 30: 6, 1990 May, 371-6
Abstract
Seventy-six patients with vascular (migraine or mixed migraine and tension) headache (HA) participated in a controlled evaluation of a minimal-therapist-contact, largely home-based, treatment program which combined relaxation (R) training with thermal biofeedback (TBF). One group received TBF + R administered in 3 office visit over 8 weeks, supplemented by audio tapes and manuals. A second group received the TBF + R plus instruction in cognitive stress coping techniques, all of which was administered in 5 office visits over 8 weeks. A third group monitored headache activity for 8 weeks. Evaluations, based on 4 weeks of HA diary at pre-treatment and after treatment, revealed significantly greater reductions in HA activity and medication consumption for both treated groups than the HA monitoring controls who did not change. Significantly more of the treated patients had clinically significant reductions in HA activity than the controls. The two treated groups did not differ on any measure.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
90316761

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Cognitive Therapy
Relaxation Techniques
Vascular Headache [DT/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Clinical Trials
Human
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 20


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Long-term follow-up of migraine treatment: do the effects remain up to six years?
Author
Lisspers J; Ost LG
Address
Psychiatric Research Center, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Behav Res Ther, 28: 4, 1990, 313-22
Abstract
Fifty migraine subjects (constituting 79% of the originally treated sample) participated in a follow-up study to 6 yr after the end of treatment. Subjects had been treated with different forms of biofeedback methods (skin temperature, BVP of the temporal artery) and applied relaxation training. The assessment included 4 weeks of continuous self-monitoring of headache activity and medication usage, as well as a retrospective self-rating scale. The main results indicated that, on a group basis, headache reductions achieved at the end of treatment persisted for up to 6 yr, and were indeed enhanced during the follow-up period.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91024894

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Male
Middle Age
Pain Measurement
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0005-7967
Country of Publication
ENGLAND


Document: 21


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Individual differences in autonomic learning: a quarter century of reflection.
Author
Ax AF
Source
Int J Psychophysiol, 10: 1, 1990 Nov, 1-9
Abstract
A series of studies carried out over the past two decades has shown selected group differences in the speed and final level of learned control of various autonomic functions. The Pavlovian and operant conditioning of as many as 6 physiological variables have revealed varying ability for this form of control. Studies were performed on subject populations that included drug-free chronic schizophrenics and healthy controls, psychopathic and non-psychopathic male juvenile delinquents, and a clinical population that included migraine sufferers and persons undergoing psychotherapy. Also studied were school dropouts in vocational training, inner-city high school seniors and junior high school students at a university school. These studies carried out on normal and abnormal individuals of strikingly different social backgrounds have lent consistent support for the hypothesis that an aptitude for autonomic learning is basic to social motivation, achievement, emotional control, and empathy.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91100237

MeSH Heading (Major)
Autonomic Nervous System [*PH]
Conditioning (Psychology) [*PH]
Individuality
MeSH Heading
Achievement
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder [PP]
Aptitude
Arousal [PH]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [PH]
Child
Conditioning, Classical [PH]
Conditioning, Operant [PH]
Emotions [PH]
Empathy
Female
Human
Juvenile Delinquency [PX]
Limbic System [PP]
Male
Motivation
Schizophrenia [PP]
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Adjustment

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0167-8760
Country of Publication
NETHERLANDS
Number Of References
32


Document: 22


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Pharmacological versus non-pharmacological prophylaxis of recurrent migraine headache: a meta-analytic review of clinical trials.
Author
Holroyd KA; Penzien DB
Address
Department of Psychology, Ohio University, Athens 45701-2979.
Source
Pain, 42: 1, 1990 Jul, 1-13
Abstract
In order to generate information about the relative effectiveness of the most widely used pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for the prophylaxis of recurrent migraine (i.e., propranolol HCl and combined relaxation/thermal biofeedback training), meta-analysis was used to integrate results from 25 clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of propranolol and 35 clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of relaxation/biofeedback training (2445 patients, collectively). Meta-analysis revealed substantial, but very similar improvements have been obtained with propranolol and with relaxation/biofeedback training. When daily recordings have been used to assess treatment outcome, both propranolol and relaxation/biofeedback have yielded a 43% reduction in migraine headache activity in the average patient. When improvements have been assessed using other outcome measures (e.g., physician/therapist ratings), improvements observed with each treatment have been about 20% greater. In both cases, improvements observed with propranolol and relaxation/biofeedback have been significantly larger than improvement observed with placebo medication (14% reduction) or in untreated patients (no reduction). Meta-analysis thus revealed substantial empirical support for the effectiveness of both propranolol and relaxation/biofeedback training, but revealed no support for the contention that the two treatments differ in effectiveness. These results suggest that greater attention should be paid to determining the relative costs and benefits of widely used pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91044447

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [DT/*PC/TH]
Propranolol [*TU]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Analysis of Variance
Comparative Study
Human
Meta-Analysis
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
ISSN
0304-3959
Country of Publication
NETHERLANDS
CAS Registry/EC Number
525-66-6 (Propranolol)


Document: 23


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Migraine headaches.
Author
Diamond S
Address
Diamond Headache Clinic, Louis A. Weiss Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.
Source
Med Clin North Am, 75: 3, 1991 May, 545-66
Abstract
Once the definitive diagnosis of migraine has been formulated, the physician has many options available for abortive and prophylactic therapy. Nonpharmacologic modalities, including behavioral modification methods such as biofeedback training, may also be considered. Migraine does not necessarily have to disrupt the lives of those afflicted. The patient with mixed headache presents a more difficult diagnostic and therapeutic problem. These patients can also be helped when the disorder is identified, and inpatient therapy for these patients may be required.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91211459

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [*/DI/PC/PP/TH]
MeSH Heading
Human

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0025-7125
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
98


Document: 24


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
The differential effects of biofeedback in the treatment of menstrual and nonmenstrual migraine [see comments]
Author
Gauthier JG; Fournier AL; Roberge C
Address
School of Psychology, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Headache, 31: 2, 1991 Feb, 82-90
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of biofeedback training in the treatment of menstrual and nonmenstrual migraine. Accordingly, 39 female patients suffering from both migraine associated, and migraine not associated, with menstrual periods were drawn from a pool of research volunteers enrolled in a biofeedback treatment program for migraine headaches. All patients were required to complete 5 weeks of daily self-monitoring of headache and menstruation activity immediately before and after treatment, and again at 6-month follow-up. Within-subjects comparisons of the effects of biofeedback on menstrual and nonmenstrual migraine, and between-subjects comparisons of the effects of biofeedback on patients suffering predominantly from either menstrual or nonmenstrual migraine showed that biofeedback is just as effective in reducing menstrual migraine as it is in reducing nonmenstrual migraine. Questions as to whether or not these conclusions can apply to patients who experience migraine headaches only during, or shortly before or after, menstruation, are raised.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
91231404

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Menstrual Cycle [*PH]
Migraine [ET/PP/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Adult
Female
Human
Middle Age

Comment Citation
Comment in: Headache 1991 Jul;31(7):484-5
Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 25


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
The role of home practice in thermal biofeedback.
Author
Blanchard EB; Nicholson NL; Radnitz CL; Steffek BD; Appelbaum KA; Dentinger MP
Address
Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, University at Albany, State University of New York 12203.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol, 59: 4, 1991 Aug, 507-12
Abstract
The role of regular home practice of hand warming was examined in the thermal biofeedback (TBF) treatment of vascular (migraine and mixed migraine and tension) headache (HA) by giving 12 sessions (over 6 weeks) of TBF to two groups of vascular HA patients (n = 23 per group). One group was asked to practice regularly at home with a home trainer between clinic sessions, whereas no mention of practice was made to the other group. A third group merely monitored HAs. Treatment was superior to no treatment. There was no advantage for the group receiving home practice, either in headache reduction or in acquisition of the hand-warming response.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92012449

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*/*IS]
Migraine [*PX/*TH]
Practice (Psychology)
Skin Temperature
Vascular Headache [*PX/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Female
Human
Male
Microcomputers
Middle Age
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted [IS]
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Thermometers

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0022-006X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 26


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Cephalic and extracephalic pressure pain thresholds in chronic tension-type headache.
Author
Schoenen J; Bottin D; Hardy F; Gerard P
Address
Department of Neurology, CHR Citadelle, University of Liège, Belgium.
Source
Pain, 47: 2, 1991 Nov, 145-9
Abstract
Pressure pain thresholds were assessed with an algometer (Somedic Inc.), over the forehead, temple and suboccipital region as well as over the Achilles tendon. A group of 32 patients suffering from chronic tension-type headache was compared to 20 healthy controls and to 10 migraineurs without aura. Although individual values were widely scattered, pressure pain thresholds were on average significantly lower in chronic tension-type headache, not only at pericranial sites but also over the Achilles tendon. Only 50% of these patients had one or more pericranial thresholds 1.5 S.D. below the mean of controls. After muscular biofeedback therapy, all pain thresholds were on average increased. Along with results obtained previously, the present data support the hypothesis that diffuse disruption of central pain-modulating systems, possibly due to a modified limbic input to the brain-stem, is pivotal in the pathophysiology of chronic tension-type headache.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92107539

MeSH Heading (Major)
Headache [*PP]
Pain [*PP]
Sensory Thresholds [*PH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Female
Human
Middle Age
Migraine [PP]
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0304-3959
Country of Publication
NETHERLANDS


Document: 27


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Home-based multicomponent treatment of pediatric migraine.
Author
Allen KD; McKeen LR
Address
Meyer Rehabilitation Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha 68198-5450.
Source
Headache, 31: 7, 1991 Jul, 467-72
Abstract
The present investigation examined a home-based multicomponent treatment program incorporating biobehavioral technology in the treatment of pediatric migraine. Twenty-one children ages 7-12 participated in home-based practice of thermal biofeedback while parents implemented guidelines designed to encourage the use of biofeedback and eliminate support for maladaptive pain behavior. Treatment was introduced sequentially across three groups of children in a multiple baseline design. When subjects and their families were complaint with treatment recommendations, 87% of the children experienced clinically significant reductions in headache activity, with these reductions maintained at 3 and 8 month followups. Treatment outcome was found to be closely related to frequency of home practice, parental support for the use of adaptive coping (biofeedback) rather than maladaptive coping (pain) behaviors, and ability to warm hands. Discussion is provided concerning potential mechanisms of action and directions for future research.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92129154

MeSH Heading (Major)
Behavior Therapy
Migraine [*TH]
Self Care
MeSH Heading
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Hand
Human
Parent-Child Relations
Patient Compliance
Skin Temperature
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 28


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Long-term effects of biofeedback on migraine headache: a prospective follow-up study.
Author
Gauthier JG; Carrier S
Address
School of Psychology, Laval University, Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Headache, 31: 9, 1991 Oct, 605-12
Abstract
The aim of the present study was two-fold: to assess the long-term effects of biofeedback on migraine, and to determine the extent to which additional treatment after biofeedback treatment is completed can affect follow-up results. Ninety-six women whose migraine had been treated through biofeedback either 2-3 years (shorter follow-up) or 6-7 years (longer follow-up) earlier were divided into four groups according to how long ago they had received their biofeedback treatment and whether or not they had received any additional treatment (whatever the nature) since the posttreatment assessment: shorter follow-up without additional treatment (n = 24), shorter follow-up with additional treatment (n = 22), longer follow-up without additional treatment (n = 24), and longer follow-up with additional treatment (n = 26). Subjects were asked to keep a headache diary for five weeks, as they had done during earlier assessments. Overall, results showed that migraine activity was significantly less at follow-up than at pretreatment. However, whether the observed long-term benefits could be attributed to biofeedback was unclear because medication was found to be as much in use at follow-up as at pretreatment. Results also indicated that 51% of the subjects did seek additional treatment between posttreatment and follow-up. Contrary to expectations, however, additional treatment was not associated with better therapeutic benefits at follow-up. The research and the clinical implications of those findings are discussed.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92129168

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Prospective Studies
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 29


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Two studies of the non-pharmacological treatment of menstrually-related migraine headaches.
Author
Kim M; Blanchard EB
Address
State University of New York, Albany 12203.
Source
Headache, 32: 4, 1992 Apr, 197-202
Abstract
In order to evaluate the effect of non-pharmacological treatment on menstrual and non-menstrual migraine headache (HA), 2 studies have been conducted. In Study 1 which was a retrospective examination of between group reactions to non-drug treatments, 37 self-defined menstrual migraineurs and 62 non-menstrual migraineurs showed comparable overall improvement (reduction in HA activity) after treatment, but menstrual migraineurs maintained larger usage of medication across time than non-menstrual migraineurs. In Study 2 which was a prospective examination of within subject reactions to non-drug treatments, 15 carefully documented menstrual migraineurs again showed comparable levels of overall improvement but also showed that level of menstrual headache activity remained higher across time than non-menstrual migraine HA. Because there were no interactions of time and type of migraine in either study, these results raise some questions about the existence of differential effectiveness of non-pharmacological treatment of menstrual vs non-menstrual migraine.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92259215

MeSH Heading (Major)
Menstruation
Migraine [PP/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Comparative Study
Female
Human
Medical Records
Middle Age
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 30


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Psychological treatment of benign headache disorders.
Author
Blanchard EB
Address
Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, State University of New York, Albany 12203.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol, 60: 4, 1992 Aug, 537-51
Abstract
This article presents a selective summarization and critique of research on the psychological treatment of headache, with the primary focus on research appearing since 1980. Suggestions for future research directions and methodological improvements are included.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
92372769

MeSH Heading (Major)
Behavior Therapy [*MT]
Headache [PX/*TH]
Migraine [PX/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Biofeedback (Psychology) [MT]
Cognitive Therapy [MT]
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Placebo Effect
Relaxation Techniques

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0022-006X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
165


Document: 31


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
"Raynaud's disease" in migraineurs: one entity or two?
Author
Kaiser RS
Address
Comprehensive Headache Center, Germantown Hospital and Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19144.
Source
Headache, 32: 9, 1992 Oct, 463-5
Abstract
Two cases are reported of patients who were diagnosed as having both migraine and Raynaud's disease. Because they were able to achieve effective control of both headaches and extremity temperature after undergoing a comprehensive approach--utilizing medication, biofeedback, and psychotherapy--it is suggested that both conditions are manifestations of the same disorder. It is recommended that a first step in approaching concurrent diagnoses of this type involve combined treatment as is often used in response to the singular diagnosis of migraine.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
93077272

MeSH Heading (Major)
Raynaud's Disease [*CO/TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Body Temperature
Case Report
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand [PP]
Human
Middle Age
Psychotherapy

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 32


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Effect of biofeedback treatment on sympathetic function in common migraine and tension-type headache.
Author
Grazzi L; Bussone G
Address
Headache Center, Neurological Institute C.Besta, Milan, Italy.
Source
Cephalalgia, 13: 3, 1993 Jun, 197-200
Abstract
Behavioral therapies such as biofeedback are commonly used to treat migraine and tension headache. Controlling sympathetic activity is effective for controlling the pain in both disturbances. A group of 26 common migraine patients and a group of 14 tension headache patients were treated by electromyographic biofeedback (EMG-BFB); blood samples were collected during the treatment (1st session; pre and post 10th session) and plasma catecholamines and cortisol measured to determine basal levels and changes induced by the behavioral therapy. The clinical efficacy of BFB treatment for tension headache and common migraine was confirmed. The basal values of the plasma stress indices were significantly different between the two groups, but did not change during treatment. The lack of correlation between the clinical improvement and the biological indices monitored indicates the need for further studies with standardized protocols in order to probe the mechanism of action of these effective behavioral therapies.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
93364964

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*PH]
Headache [BL/*PP/*TH]
Migraine [BL/*PP/*TH]
Sympathetic Nervous System [ME/*PP]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Human
Hydrocortisone [BL]
Norepinephrine [BL]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0333-1024
Country of Publication
NORWAY
CAS Registry/EC Number
50-23-7 (Hydrocortisone)
51-41-2 (Norepinephrine)


Document: 33


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Italian experience of electromyographic-biofeedback treatment of episodic common migraine: preliminary results.
Author
Grazzi L; Bussone G
Address
Headache Center, National Neurological Institute C. Besta, Milan, Italy.
Source
Headache, 33: 8, 1993 Sep, 439-41
Abstract
Electromyographic biofeedback is commonly used successfully to treat tension-type headache, while thermal biofeedback is considered the best behavioral therapy for migraine. Ten female patients with episodic common migraine (age 20-35 years, age of disease onset 16.2 +/- 5.1 years, illness duration 13.6 +/- 10.7 years) were treated by 16 twice-weekly electromyographic biofeedback and relaxation training sessions with breathing exercises. Follow-up sessions were held 1,3,6 and 12 months after the end of treatment. A significant decrease in migraine episodes was noted after therapy. More importantly, pain episodes continued to decline up to the last follow-up 12 months later. Electromyographic activity was within the normal range throughout treatment and follow-up, and there was no relationship between electromyographic activity and pain index. It is concluded that the results, particularly after a year's follow-up, are encouraging for the use of this technique to treat migraine. However, the behavioral changes and increased well-being did not correlate with muscular tension. Control of breathing, peripheral temperature and muscle activity are probably important common factors mediating learned ability to influence sympathetic activity; it is probably the latter which leads to reduced pain in migraine patients.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
94086312

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*MT]
Electromyography
Migraine [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Relaxation Techniques

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 34


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Effects of behavioral psychophysiological treatment on schoolchildren with migraine in a nonclinical setting: predictors and process variables.
Author
Osterhaus SO; Passchier J; van der Helm-Hylkema H; de Jong KT; Orlebeke JF; de Grauw AJ; Dekker PH
Address
Department of Psychophysiology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
J Pediatr Psychol, 18: 6, 1993 Dec, 697-715
Abstract
Evaluated the outcome of a combined behavioral therapy, comprising relaxation training, temperature biofeedback, and cognitive training, administered in a school setting, at posttreatment, and 7-month follow-up, on a group of schoolchildren with migraine. Comparison between the experimental group (n = 32) and the waiting-list control group (n = 9) showed a treatment effect on headache frequency and duration but not on intensity. Using a 50% reduction in the headache activity as a criterion for clinical improvement, 45% of the children in the experimental group were clinically improved at the end of the treatment. The treated subjects were found to have maintained significant improvement at follow-up. Sex, headache history, age, and psychosomatic complaints before the training emerged as predictors of outcome. A decrease in state anxiety and an increase in the ability to relax during the sessions contributed to headache improvement. Finally, the acquired capacity to raise one's finger temperature during the biofeedback sessions was related to headache reduction after the training.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
94186878

MeSH Heading (Major)
Arousal
Behavior Therapy [*MT]
Migraine [PX/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Biofeedback (Psychology) [MT]
Child
Cognitive Therapy [MT]
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Human
Male
Relaxation Techniques
Skin Temperature
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0146-8693
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 35


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Migraine headaches: coping efficacy of guided imagery training.
Author
Ilacqua GE
Address
Ministry of Correctional Services, Vanier Centre, Brampton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Headache, 34: 2, 1994 Feb, 99-102
Abstract
This study compares the effectiveness of guided imagery, (psychosynthetic approach), and biofeedback in the treatment of migraine headache. Specifically, the volunteer's subjective perception of the efficacy of the treatments is assessed. The subjects were 40 male and female volunteers presenting with migraine headache diagnosis at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Canada. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment conditions or to a control group. All subjects attended six sessions of training. Measures were completed pre- and post-treatment. The results did not reveal significant reduction in migraine activity in any of the treatment groups. There were no differences among the groups regarding the intake of medication. Nevertheless the implementation of guided imagery training resulted in subjective reports of improved capacity to cope with the pain and in subjective reports of a reduced perception of the pain itself, although objective measures did not indicate an appreciable change in migraine activity. Findings from the present study do not support either feedback or guided imagery training as more effective in counteracting migraines although subjective reports do favor guided imagery as having a positive influence on the perception of migraine pain. These findings are discussed from the perspective of empowering the sufferers by providing them with a more active role in dealing with the migraine triggering physiology, abandoning the "learned helplessness" typical of chronic pain syndromes. The issue of cost effectiveness is raised and it supports the use of guided imagery versus biofeedback training given the lack of theoretical agreement in the current literature.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
94216126

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [*TH]
Psychotherapy
MeSH Heading
Adaptation, Psychological
Female
Human
Male

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 36


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
The role of home practice in the thermal biofeedback treatment of migraine headache.
Author
Gauthier J; Côté G; French D
Address
School of Psychology, Laval University, Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol, 62: 1, 1994 Feb, 180-4
Abstract
The present study examined the role of home practice of hand warming in the thermal biofeedback treatment of migraine headache. Seventeen female migraine sufferers were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: thermal biofeedback with regular home practice (HP) or thermal biofeedback without home practice (NHP). Biofeedback treatment consisted of 12 training sessions over a 6-week period, and all subjects completed 5 weeks of headache monitoring before and after treatment. Results indicated that subjects in the HP condition experienced decreases in headache activity and medication intake that were both statistically and clinically significant compared with the NHP condition. None of the outcome measures revealed significant improvement in the NHP condition. Thus, regular home practice appears to enhance the efficacy of biofeedback in the treatment of migraine.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
94308375

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Migraine [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adult
Body Temperature
Comparative Study
Female
Hand
Human
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0022-006X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 37


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Migraine headaches in children.
Author
Singer HS
Address
Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
Source
Pediatr Rev, 15: 3, 1994 Mar, 94-101; quiz 101
Abstract
Migraine headaches are common in children and adolescents, and stricter diagnostic criteria have been developed. Children have a variety of migraine syndromes, ranging from frequent, mild, bifrontal headaches to severe debilitating, unilateral pain associated with persistent motor or visual deficits. Neurodiagnostic studies are indicated in those individuals who have accompanying signs or symptoms that raise concern. The treatment of migraine must be individualized and requires more than just the use of pharmacotherapy. Reassurance and the elimination of potential triggering factors are essential components of care. Symptomatic therapy with analgesics and rest often is sufficient. Behavioral therapy, consisting of psychological support, relaxation exercises, and biofeedback training, is effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine. Ergotamines are valuable agents for abortive treatment, but should be reserved for use in the older child. Parenteral use of DHE is an effective treatment for the rare child who has an acute severe migraine unresponsive to other therapies. A variety of agents are available for the long-term stabilization of childhood migraine.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
94316562

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [CL/DT/*ET]
MeSH Heading
Analgesics [AE/TU]
Child
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ergotamine [AE/TU]
Human

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0191-9601
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
21
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Analgesics)
113-15-5 (Ergotamine)


Document: 38


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Effect of biofeedback-assisted relaxation on migraine headache and changes in cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery.
Author
McGrady A; Wauquier A; McNeil A; Gerard G
Address
Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo 43699-0008.
Source
Headache, 34: 7, 1994 Jul-Aug, 424-8
Abstract
Twenty-three patients with diagnosed migraine headaches were randomly assigned to a biofeedback-assisted relaxation therapy group or to a group who relaxed on their own. The biofeedback trained group decreased pain and medication more than the self relax group. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery with transcranial doppler (TCD). The trained group significantly reduced systolic and mean cerebral blood flow velocity on the side with the highest velocity.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95013304

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Migraine [*PP]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Cerebral Arteries [PP]
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 39


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Overview of diagnosis and treatment of migraine.
Author
Silberstein SD; Lipton RB
Address
Comprehensive Headache Center, Germantown Hospital and Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Source
Neurology, 44: 10 Suppl 7, 1994 Oct, S6-16
Abstract
Optimal migraine therapy begins with an accurate diagnosis and knowledge of the symptoms that the patient finds most disturbing. Pharmacologic treatment of migraine may be acute (abortive, symptomatic) or preventive (prophylactic); both approaches are frequently required in patients with frequent, severe headaches. Drugs for acute care consist of analgesics, antiemetics, anxiolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ergots, steroids, major tranquilizers, narcotics, and selective serotonin agonists. Preventive agents include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, antidepressants, serotonin antagonists, and anticonvulsants. The choice of a preventive drug depends on side effect profiles and comorbid conditions. Behavioral interventions, such as biofeedback and relaxation techniques, are an important complement to pharmacologic therapy; however, drugs are the mainstay of migraine therapy. To ensure that therapy achieves optimal results, the individual patient's preferred approach to this debilitating problem must be considered carefully.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95059979

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [*DI/*DT]
MeSH Heading
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists [TU]
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal [TU]
Anticonvulsants [TU]
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic [TU]
Calcium Channel Blockers [TU]
Dihydroergotamine [TU]
Ergotamine [TU]
Human
Serotonin Antagonists [TU]
Sumatriptan [TU]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0028-3878
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
98
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Adrenergic beta-Antagonists)
0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal)
0 (Anticonvulsants)
0 (Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic)
0 (Calcium Channel Blockers)
0 (Serotonin Antagonists)
103628-46-2 (Sumatriptan)
113-15-5 (Ergotamine)
511-12-6 (Dihydroergotamine)


Document: 40


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Autogenic training: a narrative and quantitative review of clinical outcome.
Author
Linden W
Address
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 19: 3, 1994 Sep, 227-64
Abstract
This review of controlled outcome research on Autogenic Training complements the literature by pooling narrative and quantitative approaches, by including only studies with experimental controls, by integrating the English and German literature, and by adding research findings published since the last review. Whereas previous reviews have already reported positive effects of Autogenic Training for migraine, insomnia, and test anxiety, additional supportive findings for angina pectoris, asthma, childbirth, eczema, hypertension, infertility, Raynaud's disease, and recovery from myocardial infarction are discussed here. The impact of protocol variations on outcome is described, and the specificity of Autogenic Training relative to other stress management techniques is highlighted. Quantitative findings suggested that Autogenic Training was associated with medium-sized pre- to posttreatment effects ranging from d = .43 for biological indices of change to d = .58 for psychological and behavioral indices thus matching effect sizes for other biobehavioral treatment techniques like biofeedback and muscular relaxation. Length of treatment did not affect clinical outcome. The discussion emphasizes how narrative and quantitative strategies complement one another.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95110904

MeSH Heading (Major)
Autogenic Training
MeSH Heading
Female
Human
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
76


Document: 41


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Treatment of childhood migraine with autogenic training and skin temperature biofeedback: a component analysis.
Author
Labbé EE
Address
Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama, Mobile 36688.
Source
Headache, 35: 1, 1995 Jan, 10-3
Abstract
Using a controlled group outcome design, skin temperature biofeedback with autogenic training and autogenic training only was compared to a waiting list as a treatment for childhood headache. Thirty children with migraine headaches, ages 7 to 18 years were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. Statistical analyses of headache activity indicated that children in the treatment groups improved in headache frequency and duration but not intensity as compared to the waiting list control group. These findings were consistent through a 6 month follow-up. In terms of clinical improvement, 80% of the biofeedback group, 50% of the autogenics group, and none of the waiting list control group were symptom-free. These findings were discussed in relation to past childhood headache studies and implications for current treatment of children with headaches.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95172808

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*/MT]
Migraine [CL/*TH]
Relaxation Techniques [*ED]
Skin Temperature
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human
Male
Patient Education

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES


Document: 42


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Stress management techniques: are they all equivalent, or do they have specific effects?
Author
Lehrer PM; Carr R; Sargunaraj D; Woolfolk RL
Address
Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-5635.
Source
Biofeedback Self Regul, 19: 4, 1994 Dec, 353-401
Abstract
This article evaluates the hypothesis that various stress management techniques have specific effects. Studies comparing various techniques are reviewed, as well as previous literature reviews evaluating the effects of individual techniques. There is evidence that cognitively oriented methods have specific cognitive effects, that specific autonomic effects result from autonomically oriented methods, and that specific muscular effects are produced by muscularly oriented methods. Muscle relaxation and/or EMG biofeedback have greater muscular effects and smaller autonomic effects than finger temperature biofeedback and/or autogenic training. EMG biofeedback produces greater effects on particular muscular groups than progressive relaxation, and thermal biofeedback has greater finger temperature effects than autogenic training. Disorders with a predominant muscular component (e.g., tension headaches) are treated more effectively by muscularly oriented methods, while disorders in which autonomic dysfunction predominates (e.g., hypertension, migraine headaches) are more effectively treated by techniques with a strong autonomic component. Anxiety and phobias tend to be most effectively treated by methods with both strong cognitive and behavioral components.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95186580

MeSH Heading (Major)
Stress [*TH]
MeSH Heading
Autogenic Training [MT]
Biofeedback (Psychology) [MT]
Comparative Study
Evaluation Studies
Human
Relaxation Techniques
Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, ACADEMIC
ISSN
0363-3586
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
300


Document: 43


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Enhancing the effectiveness of relaxation-thermal biofeedback training with propranolol hydrochloride.
Author
Holroyd KA; France JL; Cordingley GE; Rokicki LA; Kvaal SA; Lipchik GL; McCool HR
Address
Department of Psychology, Ohio University, Athens 45701-2979, USA.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol, 63: 2, 1995 Apr, 327-30
Abstract
This article evaluated the ability of propranolol to enhance results achieved with relaxation-biofeedback training. Thirty-three patients were randomized to relaxation-biofeedback training alone (administered in a limited-contact treatment format), or to relaxation-biofeedback training accompanied by long-acting propranolol (with dosage individualized at 60, 120, or 180 mg/day). Concomitant propranolol therapy significantly enhanced the effectiveness of relaxation-biofeedback training when either daily headache recordings (79% vs. 54% reduction in migraine activity) or neurologist clinical evaluations (90% vs. 66% reduction) were used to assess treatment outcome. Concomitant propranolol therapy also yielded larger reductions in analgesic medication use and greater improvements of quality of life measures than relaxation-biofeedback training alone but was more frequently associated with side effects.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95270821

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology) [*DE]
Migraine [PX/*TH]
Propranolol [*AD]
Relaxation Techniques
Skin Temperature [*DE]
MeSH Heading
Adolescence
Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age
Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0022-006X
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
CAS Registry/EC Number
525-66-6 (Propranolol)


Document: 44


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Behavioral and prophylactic pharmacological intervention studies of pediatric migraine: an exploratory meta-analysis.
Author
Hermann C; Kim M; Blanchard EB
Address
Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, SUNY, Albany 12203, USA.
Source
Pain, 60: 3, 1995 Mar, 239-55
Abstract
In this review, the effectiveness of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for pediatric migraine was quantitatively summarized following the meta-analytic approach outlined by Hedges and Olkin (1985). A first meta-analysis based on treatment outcome within treatment conditions revealed that thermal biofeedback and interventions combining biofeedback and progressive muscle relaxation seem to be significantly more efficacious than other behavioral treatment modalities, psychological and drug placebo, and the more commonly used prophylactic drug regimens. Though there is some evidence suggesting good effectiveness of propranolol, the lack of systematic data precludes more definitive conclusions. A second meta-analysis that included only studies providing data on the comparison between control versus active treatment conditions replicated the initial findings only partially. In the light of the relative small number of studies that met basic inclusion requirements, the methodological flaws of many studies, and the under-representation of certain treatment types, conclusions regarding differential effectiveness of the treatment types have to be drawn with caution. Overall, our findings clearly demonstrate the need for direct comparisons between behavioral and pharmacological treatments and the need for more theory-driven research in order to determine the most promising treatment approaches for pediatric migraine.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95319728

MeSH Heading (Major)
Behavioral Medicine
Migraine [PC/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Child
Clonidine [TU]
Dopamine Agents [TU]
Human
Muscle Relaxation
Serotonin Agonists [TU]
Treatment Outcome
Vasodilator Agents [TU]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
ISSN
0304-3959
Country of Publication
NETHERLANDS
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Dopamine Agents)
0 (Serotonin Agonists)
0 (Vasodilator Agents)
4205-90-7 (Clonidine)


Document: 45


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Advances in migraine management.
Author
Lewis TA; Solomon GD
Address
Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.
Source
Cleve Clin J Med, 62: 3, 1995 May-Jun, 148-55
Abstract
New drugs and better understanding of the pathogenesis of migraine are improving the outlook for patients with this debilitating disorder. This paper reviews recent advances and outlines our approach.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95330859

MeSH Heading (Major)
Migraine [DI/ET/*TH]
MeSH Heading
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists [TU]
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal [TU]
Antidepressive Agents [TU]
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Calcium Channel Blockers [TU]
Combined Modality Therapy
Forecasting
Human
Medical History Taking
Valproic Acid [TU]

Publication Type
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
ISSN
0891-1150
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES
Number Of References
79
CAS Registry/EC Number
0 (Adrenergic beta-Antagonists)
0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal)
0 (Antidepressive Agents)
0 (Calcium Channel Blockers)
99-66-1 (Valproic Acid)


Document: 46


Record from database: MEDLINE

Title
Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity associated with biofeedback-assisted relaxation treatment of migraine headaches are specific for the middle cerebral artery.
Author
Wauquier A; McGrady A; Aloe L; Klausner T; Collins B
Address
Department of Neurology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock 79430, USA.
Source
Headache, 35: 6, 1995 Jun, 358-62
Abstract
Twenty-five patients with diagnosed migraine headaches were randomly assigned to a biofeedback-assisted relaxation therapy group or to a group who relaxed on their own. This study confirmed that the biofeedback trained group significantly decreased pain and medication more than the self-relax group. The best responders were those with the more elevated initial cerebral blood flow values and the changes in cerebral blood flow were specific for the middle cerebral artery.
Language of Publication
English
Unique Identifier
95362531

MeSH Heading (Major)
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Cerebral Arteries [*PP]
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Migraine [DT/*PP/*TH]
Relaxation Techniques
MeSH Heading
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Comparative Study
Female
Human
Male
Middle Age

Publication Type
CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
ISSN
0017-8748
Country of Publication
UNITED STATES

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